CSRHub Blog Research on ESG metrics and comments on sustainability best practice

Women's Network for a Sustainable Future Event

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 4, 2014 9:15:45 PM / by CSRHub Blogging

wnsf PHOTO

Cynthia Figge, Cofounder and COO of CSRHub, will be attending the Sustainable Seattle and Women’s Network for a Sustainable Future Event on March 6th.

Connect with other women and men to discuss women in sustainability and how we can create new systems to move sustainable business forward.

The guest speaker is KoAnn Vikoren Skrzyniarz, CEO/Founder of Sustainable Brands, presents Getting the Frame Right – What Comes Next For Women Leading Sustainability.

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

5:00 -7:30 pm

Presentations begin at 5:30 pm

Adobe Systems Inc

801 North 34th Street, Seattle

Tickets: $15 online

$20 day of and at the door

Appetizers & non-Alcoholic Beverages included

Register

Want to read more on this topic? Check out KoAnn's article Getting the Frame Right

There are 2 scholarship tickets left, contact Cheryl @ wnsf.seattle@gmail.com


Cynthia FiggeCynthia Figge is a forerunner and thought leader in the corporate sustainability movement. She is COO and Cofounder of CSRHub, the world’s largest database that aggregates and organizes data and knowledge on the social, environmental, and governance performance of 8,400 companies to provide sustainability ratings to the marketplace. In 1996 she co-founded EKOS International, one of the first consultancies integrating sustainability and corporate strategy. Prior to founding EKOS, she was an officer of LIN Broadcasting / McCaw Cellular, and led new businesses and services with Weyerhaeuser, New York Daily News; and with New Ventures. Cynthia is Board Director of the Compassionate Action Network International. Cynthia received her bachelor's degree in Economics and an MBA from the Harvard Business School. She lives in the Seattle area.

CSRHub provides access to corporate social responsibility and sustainability ratings and information on 8,900 companies from 135 industries in 103 countries. By aggregating and normalizing the information from 300+ data sources, CSRHub has created a broad, consistent rating system and a searchable database that links millions of rating elements back to their source. Managers, researchers and activists use CSRHub to benchmark company performance, learn how stakeholders evaluate company CSR practices and seek ways to change the world.

 

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments posted in CSR, Women's Network for a Sustainable Future, Sustainable Seattle, Uncategorized, WNSF, sustainability, Sustainable Brands conference, CSRHub

Join us for our Valentine's Day Chocolate and Champagne Event!

[fa icon="calendar'] Jan 30, 2013 9:05:15 AM / by Cynthia Figge

By Cynthia Figge

one billion rising

We invite you to “Rise Up Seattle", a One Billion Rising event on February 14th. As co-founder of the local chapter of the Women’s Network for a Sustainable Future (WNSF), Cynthia is happy to announce that WNSF is a co-sponsor of this exciting event.

ONE BILLION RISING began as a call to action based on the staggering statistic that 1 in 3 women on the planet will be beaten or raped during her lifetime.  With the world population at 7 billion, this adds up to more than ONE BILLION WOMEN AND GIRLS.  On February 14, 2013, V-Day’s 15th anniversary, we will join activists, writers, thinkers, celebrities, and women and men across the world as we demand change, strike, dance, and RISE UP in defiance of the injustices women suffer, demanding an end at last to violence against women.

“When we started V-Day 14 years ago, we had the outrageous idea that we could end violence against women,” said Eve Ensler. “Now, we are both stunned and thrilled to see that this global action is truly escalating and gaining force, with union workers, parliament members, celebrities, and women of all backgrounds coming forward to join the campaign. When we come together on February 14, 2013 to demand an end to violence against women and girls it will be a truly global voice that will rise up.”

RISE UP SEATTLE
Chocolate & Champagne Event

February 14th, 5:30-7:30+

The Center for Impact and Innovation

Information and tickets here

$15/person or $25/2 people (All are Welcome)

Ticket includes 2 tickets for champagne and/or microbrew

Be part of V-day, watch sensational dancers, an awe-inspiring singer and see film clips from a recently completed documentary while drinking champagne and enjoying Blommer Chocolates. 

Our RISE UP SEATTLE Chocolate & Champagne event features art forms that celebrate the women and men who rise up to resist violence:

University of Washington Dancers - An Accomplished Singer - Powerful film clips - Amazing dancer Chris Daigre of Ewajo Center, leading participants in a dance of solidarity to end violence against women.

Learn More about the Event's Featured Non-Profits

Thank you to our hosts & sponsors

            

WNSF-Pacific NW website

  Join our LinkedIn Group
Or like us on Facebook


Cynthia Figge, Cofounder and COO of CSRHub is a forerunner and thought leader in the corporate sustainability movement. In 1996 she co-founded EKOS International, one of the first consultancies integrating sustainability and corporate strategy. Cynthia has worked with major organizations including BNSF, Boeing, Coca-Cola, Dow Jones, Noranda and REI to help craft sustainability strategy integrated with business. She was an Officer of LIN Broadcasting/McCaw Cellular leading new services development, and started a new “Greenfield” mill with Weyerhaeuser. She serves as Advisor to SNS Future in Review, Board Director for Compassionate Action Network, and served as President of the Board of Sustainable Seattle. Cynthia has an MBA from Harvard Business School. Cynthia is based in the Seattle area.

CSRHub provides access to corporate social responsibility and sustainability ratings and information on nearly 7,000 companies from 135 industries in 82 countries. By aggregating and normalizing the information from 200 data sources, CSRHub has created a broad, consistent rating system and a searchable database that links millions of rating elements back to their source. Managers, researchers and activists use CSRHub to benchmark company performance, learn how stakeholders evaluate company CSR practices and seek ways to change the world.


Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments posted in corporate social responsibility, CSR, Cynthia Figge, Women's Network for a Sustainable Future, Uncategorized, WNSF, socially responsible investing, sustainability, Rise Up Seattle, corporate responsibility, One Billion Rising, SRI

The Power of Three Degrees

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 8, 2011 10:36:00 AM / by Cynthia Figge

The Women’s Network for a Sustainable Future (WNSF) Seattle Chapter recently hosted an event at the University of Washington Law School featuring the story and work of two women, Jeni Krencicki Barcelos and Jen Marlow. The two came to law school to reframe climate change as a justice issue, not a technical or economic issue, where they discovered their mutual passion for addressing global climate change, and co-created Three Degrees. Three Degrees’ mission is to promote fair and equitable adaptation strategies for the world's most vulnerable communities. Here is an overview of Three Degrees, an inspiring story of the power of identifying real problems in the world, and setting out to solve them.

Based on the idea that “climate change threatens basic rights to health, food and water, security, equity, and justice,” Three Degrees has developed a fascinating framework for thinking about and understanding climate justice.

  1. Health: The effects of climate change seriously impacts global health and leans disproportionately on the already weak. For example, extreme heat events kill more people than all other natural disasters combined. Low-income people, who often cannot afford expensive cooling systems and may not have sufficient access to water, and the elderly, who are more naturally susceptible to extreme heat, are the most vulnerable to extreme climate situations.
  2. Food & Water: Climate change directly impacts global food and water supply. David Battisti, a food security scientist with the University of Washington, has estimated that for every degree of global temperature change, crop yields will decrease by 10%. Similarly, temperature increases have left bodies of fresh water around the world severely depleted. Africa’s Lake Chad now holds only 20% of the water it did 50 years ago. 
  3. Security: In many countries, climate change is a major contributor to national political instability. Cambodia – a country that depends largely on a network of NGOs that cripples its weak internal government – is just one of several countries particularly at risk for national unrest. Flooding and other climate disasters are common occurrences that create national upheaval and the government is largely unable to provide assistance to its people.
  4. Equity: Economic hardship is disproportionately affecting the poor. Small-scale farmers, for example, can no longer rely on age-old farming practices to make their living because of changes in seasonality and sea level. Oftentimes, those living in poverty cannot afford the re-education or investment necessary to sustain their means of livelihood or to switch professions.
  5. Justice: Those who are harmed or displaced by climate change cannot easily seek retribution through the justice system because there are few legal precedents or policies in place to prosecute those who commit climate-related injustices. Some are fighting to create precedents in these areas. Kivalina, AK filed a lawsuit against a group of oil giants that includes BP and Exxon-Mobil. Residents claim the companies are responsible for the global warming that has caused the erosion of their town.  

As leading climate researcher David Archer has written, even if we stop emitting carbon dioxide now, the long tail extends to tens of thousands of years and raises profound questions for intergenerational justice.


Cynthia Figge, Cofounder and COO of CSRHUB is a forerunner and thought leader in the corporate sustainability movement. In 1996 she co-founded EKOS International, one of the first consultancies integrating sustainability and corporate strategy. Cynthia has worked with major organizations including BNSF, Boeing, Coca-Cola, Dow Jones, and REI to help craft sustainability strategy integrated with business. She was an Officer of LIN Broadcasting/McCaw Cellular leading new services development, and started a new “Greenfield” mill with Weyerhaeuser. She serves as Advisor to media and technology companies, and served as President of the Board of Sustainable Seattle. Cynthia has an MBA from Harvard Business School. Cynthia is based in the Seattle area.

 

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments posted in corporate social responsibility, CSR, Cynthia Figge, ESG, governance, green, social, sustainability ratings, Women's Network for a Sustainable Future, social investing, Uncategorized, socially responsible investing, sustainability, climate justice, corporate responsibility, CSR ratings, CSRHub, environment, SRI, Three Degrees

A Sustainability Mystique for Women

[fa icon="calendar'] Apr 4, 2011 9:30:00 AM / by Cynthia Figge

By Cynthia Figge

 

In a recent study by the White House on the status of women, its first since 1963, women now make up 57% of college enrollment. Yet in 2009, at all levels of education, they earned only 75 percent as much as their male counterparts. How far have we come, and where are we going?

 

1963 was the auspicious year of Betty Friedan’s publication of feminism’s cornerstone text, The Feminine Mystique. Revisiting the book, I was surprised to discover new meaning in Friedan’s message—one with a decidedly progressive bent, even for 2011.

 

Stephanie Coontz’s book A Strange Stirring provides a compelling critique of the impact of The Feminine Mystique as an impetus for the profound changes brought by the women’s movement in the 60s and 70s. In the event you think women are not doing well enough, she outlines that we have come a long way since 1963. Clearly Friedan encouraged women to embrace, rather than repudiate, their aspirations for a life beyond the home.

 

What I did not know was that Friedan urged both women and men to use their education and talents in meaningful work that served a higher purpose. It is this call to integrate our work with a higher purpose that may be one of the most critical drivers of the sustainability movement.

 

Considering the vast transformation required to evolve our global economic system towards sustainability, the yearning for social utility in work is motivating many young people today to be a part of the solution. At both Harvard and Columbia Universities’ business schools, about 25% of all students are members of their environmental and sustainability clubs. Demand for work in this area is intense and many MBA graduates say they would sacrifice pay for work where they can solve social problems and make a difference in the world.

 

Although all are welcome, women may be particularly called upon to lead the sustainability movement. I recently joined with other sustainability leaders in the Northwest to launch the Seattle chapter of the Women’s Network for a Sustainable Future (WNSF). Last fall, Jean Brittingham kicked off the inaugural gathering of over 70 women by saying that female memes have been absent for the past five to seven thousand years, and now is the time to bring our feminine traits – passion, curiosity, a solutions-first focus, intuition, relationship-based action and multitasking—to the sustainability movement.

 

Costco’s head of sustainability, Sheri Flies, added that we must understand the balance of women’s and men’s traits, and that she has seen some 30-something year old men embracing their own feminine attributes in their work styles.

 

Gifford Pinchot, co-founder of the Bainbridge Graduate Institute, spoke about the risk facing our civilization, pointing out that as we move from knowledge work to creative work, women are the drivers of sustainable organizations, enterprises, and culture.

 

In her article Gender and the Sustainable Brain, Andrea Learned argues that encouraging the relational and empathetic aspects of human thinking [those aspects which are more typical of women] – and “better balancing that which has been perceived as masculine and feminine – will lead us to a more sustainable, enduring and productive global economy.”

 

So is this the time for women to “dominate” and “take over” to lead corporations and the world to sustainability? The recent article, The End of Men, in The Atlantic, indicates that this may be “our time.” Women’s growth in leadership has been barred by the dearth of women in the pipeline for the C suite, and too few female mentors. However, this is finally changing.

 

Joanna Barsh (a classmate at Harvard Business School) raises provocative issues in her book, How Remarkable Women Lead, such as whether feminine leadership traits (for women and men) are better suited for our fast-changing, hyper-competitive, and increasingly complex world. The good news is that women are tracking into sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR) roles, and bringing a rich reservoir of strength, optimism for the future, and grounded ways to change the world. After five to seven thousand years, it’s about time.   

 


Cynthia Figge, Cofounder and COO of CSRHUB is a forerunner and thought leader in the corporate sustainability movement. In 1996 she co-founded EKOS International, one of the first consultancies integrating sustainability and corporate strategy. Cynthia has worked with major organizations including BNSF, Boeing, Coca-Cola, Dow Jones, and REI to help craft sustainability strategy integrated with business. She was an Officer of LIN Broadcasting/McCaw Cellular leading new services development, and started a new “Greenfield” mill with Weyerhaeuser. She serves as Advisor to media and technology companies, and served as President of the Board of Sustainable Seattle. Cynthia has an MBA from Harvard Business School. Cynthia is based in the Seattle area.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments posted in Bainbridge Graduate Institute, Betty Friedan, ColumbiaUniversity, corporate social responsibility, Costco, CSR, Cynthia Figge, female leaders, Gender and the Sustainable Brain, Gifford Pinchot, Harvard Business School, Women's Network for a Sustainable Future, Sheri Flies, Uncategorized, White House, women in business, sustainability, The End of Men, Jean Brittingham, Joanna Barsh, Stephanie Coontz, sustainable MBA, women in college, A Strange Stirring, Andrea Learned, CSRHub, How Remarkable Women Lead, status of women, The Atlantic, The Feminine Mystique

Subscribe to Email Updates

Lists by Topic

see all

Posts by Topic

see all