CSRHub Blog Research on ESG metrics and comments on sustainability best practice

Benchmark Your Sustainability Performance on New Enablon Wizness Publisher

[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 25, 2015 9:40:07 AM / by CSRHub Blogging

CSRHub and Wizness Publisher

Today, we are announcing the release of the new CSRHub Benchmarking Template, available on the Enablon Wizness Publisher platform. Building on CSRHub’s partnership with Enablon, our teams have joined forces to imagine this new online tool which will enable you to:

  • Assess your own performance: Evaluate your Sustainability Performance using the CSRHub ratings methodology, covering the four categories of environment, employee, community and governance.
  • Benchmark your performance with your peers: Evaluate the Sustainability strategy of your competitors, identify the leaders and laggards of your industry and compare your ratings to theirs.
  • Identify your strengths and weaknesses: By comparing your own CSRHub ratings to industry peers of your choice, the benchmark helps you identify the Sustainability areas in which you excel, or need improvement.

Excited about discovering how well you perform? Start your own benchmark now!

Start My Benchmark

Wondering how it works? Enter your company name and up to 4 of your competitors and the Publisher will use the CSRHub data to generate an online and interactive benchmarking report like this one:

Benchmarking CSR_Wizness and CSRHub

If you have any questions about this new exciting tool, you can take a look at the FAQ or at the template tutorial when you click Start My Benchmark above. If you don’t find what you’re looking for, we’d love to hear from you!

 

 

About Wizness

Wizness is an online platform which enables companies to collect their Sustainability data, create their online Sustainability profile, design & publish interactive, mobile ready CSR reports, and engage in interactive conversations with their stakeholders. Through its services, Wizness enables organizations to reduce their reputational risks and communication costs as well as reinforce their brands.

Wizness is powered by Enablon, the world’s leading software provider of Sustainability, EH&S and Risk Management solutions.

For more info about Wizness, please visit https://publisher.wizness.com/

For more info about Enablon, please visit http://enablon.com/

 

About CSRHub 

CSRHub provides access to the world’s largest corporate social responsibility and sustainability ratings and information, covering on 13,700+ companies from 135 industries in 127 countries. By aggregating and normalizing the information from 370+ data sources, CSRHub has created a broad, consistent rating system and a searchable database that links millions of rating elements back to their source. Managers, researchers and activists use CSRHub to benchmark company performance, learn how stakeholders evaluate company CSR practices, and seek ways to change the world.

CSRHub is a B Corporation, an Organizational Stakeholder (OS) with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), a silver partner with Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP), and an Advisory Council Member of Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB).

 

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CSRHub Launches 4 New Dashboard Templates

[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 19, 2015 9:35:27 AM / by CSRHub Blogging

 

Dashboard Supply Chain Anaylsis

 New Ranking Percentile Comparisons allow you to compare a company
to other companies in the same industry and country

                                                   

CSRHub works for you                   

CSRHub just released four new products that simplify your sustainability analysis. Each CSRHub Dashboard is an Excel-based template that uses sustainability metrics and ratings to answer questions and solve problems. These competitively priced Company Diagnostic, Competitor Benchmark, CSR/ESG Research and Supply Chain Analysis Dashboards come with enough time to access the full database to complete a project. CSRHub’s Dashboard templates for reporting are priced $79-$199.

Now you can easily enter company names and a date, click calculate and let CSRHub do an analysis. CSRHub Dashboard spreadsheets can show a heat map of ratings, compare percentile rankings, and pull sheets of additional sustainability information.

Do you need to:

  • Run a report on one company’s sustainability performance?
  • Benchmark competitors, customers and peers? Compare who reported to the CDP, GRI, or the UN Global Compact?
  • Check the sustainability status of up to 200 suppliers?
  • See a list of company’s CSR websites?
  • Perform CSR/ESG research on company performance over time?

A Full Access subscription includes all four of the dashboards listed above, plus full access to the CSRHub site for one year. You can see a full list of the new CSRHub products here.


CSRHub provides access to corporate social responsibility and sustainability ratings and information on 13,736+ companies from 135 industries in 127 countries. Managers, researchers and activists use CSRHub to benchmark company performance, learn how stakeholders evaluate company CSR practices and seek ways to change the world.

 

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What’s New at CSRHub? A lot!

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 16, 2014 9:44:38 AM / by Bahar Gidwani

By Bahar Gidwani

Last week, we upgraded the CSRHub web site with many new benefits and features our members have been requesting.  We also officially launched our new CSRHub Dashboard, an Excel-based tool that allows our subscribers to bring millions of data points from our system into our custom templates and into their own internal systems.

CSRHub Dashboard

segment of the CSRHub Dashboard template

This is the fifth major update we’ve made to our site since we first went live in late 2010.  We also update our data monthly.  Our data extends back to December of 2008, so we will soon have seven full years of monthly data available to subscribers.

Curious what we added to the site?  Request a Demo to see what we are offering at our Full Access subscriber level. We will continue to give free basic ratings on more than 10,000 companies and organizations.  We also show non-subscribers some of our sources and some data history.

You can see a sample of what subscribers see on this page.  The new features include:

  • Subscribers can see ratings and rankings.  Over the past three years, many of our users have said that in addition to knowing a company’s absolute sustainability performance (rating), they want to see how a company compares to its peers (rankings).  Now, our subscribers can see these two different ways of comparing company sustainability performance on the same page.
  • Drill down to see what sources contribute to each rating element.  Our users have also been asking us to tell them which elements from each of our 365 sources have something to say about each aspect of the 10,000 companies we track.  Our new company page gives this information.  (Our subscribers can drill down even further by using our CSRHub Dashboard.)
  • Better graphs.  Most people find it easier to understand data when it is presented graphically.  Our new graph allows our subscribers to compare one company’s ratings with those of another company or with the average for an industry or country.  Users can pull category or subcategory ratings into the graph and change the timescale to cover any date range from 2008 to the present.CSRHub interactive graph
  • More clarity about which sources are active.  Until now we’ve shown all of the sources that report on each company we cover.  However, it was hard for our users to figure out if the data from older sources still contributed to our ratings.  We now divide each company’s sources into those that are active (still contribute to ratings) and those that are inactive (not contributing).CSRHub data sources impacting a rating

There are two other important changes in this release.  One is tools-related—we introduced a new Excel template we call CSRHub Dashboard.  The other is technical—major changes in the back end of our site.  We’ll describe the rest of these changes in our next post.


Bahar GidwaniBahar Gidwani is CEO and Co-founder of CSRHub.  He has built and run large technology-based businesses for many years. Bahar holds a CFA, worked on Wall Street with Kidder, Peabody, and with McKinsey & Co. Bahar has consulted to a number of major companies and currently serves on the board of several software and Web companies. He has an MBA from Harvard Business School and an undergraduate degree in physics and astronomy. Bahar is a member of the SASB Advisory Board.  He plays bridge, races sailboats, and is based in New York City.

CSRHub provides access to the world’s largest corporate social responsibility and sustainability ratings and information, covering on 10,000 companies from 135 industries in 104 countries. By aggregating and normalizing the information from 365 data sources, CSRHub has created a broad, consistent rating system and a searchable database that links millions of rating elements back to their source. Managers, researchers and activists use CSRHub to benchmark company performance, learn how stakeholders evaluate company CSR practices, and seek ways to improve corporate sustainability performance.

CSRHub is a B Corporation, an Organizational Stakeholder (OS) with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), a silver partner with CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project), and an Advisory Council Member of Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB).

 

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Using “Big Data” to Rate Corporate Social Responsibility: One Company’s Approach

[fa icon="calendar'] Oct 22, 2014 10:09:00 AM / by Bahar Gidwani

The following is part 1 of a 3-part series on “Big Data.”

By Bahar Gidwani

“Big Data” is a useful tool for rating corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability performance.  We believe that the Big Data system that CSRHub has developed is one answer to dealing with the rise in new ratings systems (it seems there is a new one announced each month) and with the disparities in scores that occur among these different systems.

In 2001, Doug Laney (currently an analyst for Gartner), foresaw that users of data were facing problems handling the Volume of data they were gathering, the Variety of data in their systems, and the Velocity with which data elements changed.  These “three Vs” are now part of most definitions of the “Big Data” area.

Ratings in the CSR space appear to be a candidate for a big data solution to its three “V” problems.

  • Volume:  There are many sources of ratings.  CSRHub currently tracks more than 330 sources of CSR information and plans to add at least another 30 sources over the next six months.  Our system already contains more than 55,000,000 pieces of data from these sources that touch more than 140,000 companies.  We hope eventually to expand our coverage to include several million companies.
  • Variety:  Each of these 330 sources uses different criteria to measure corporate sustainability and social performance.  A number of comprehensive sustainability measurement approaches have been created.  Unfortunately, each new entrant into the area seems compelled to create yet another system.
  • Velocity:  With hundreds of thousands of companies to measure and at least 330 different measurement systems, the perceived sustainability performance of companies constantly changes.  Many of the available ratings systems track these changes only on a quarterly or annual basis.

Most systems for measuring the CSR and sustainability performance of corporations rely on human-based analysis.  A researcher selects a set of companies to study, determines the criteria he or she wishes to use to evaluate their performance, and then collects the data needed to support the study.  When the researcher can’t find a required data item in a company’s sustainability report or press releases, he or she may try to contact the company to get the data.

Some research firms try to streamline this process by sending out a questionnaire that covers all the things they want to know.  Then, they follow up to encourage companies to answer their questions and follow up again after they receive the answers, to check the facts and be sure their questions were answered consistently.  An NAEM survey showed that its members were seeing an average of more than ten of these results in 2011, and some large companies say they receive as many as 300 survey requests per year.

Graph on External Data

NAEM Green Metrics That Matter Report—2012 for 35 members.

Both the direct and survey-driven approaches to data gathering are reasonable and can lead to sound ratings and valuable insights.  However, both are limited in several important ways:

  • The studied companies are the primary source of the data used to evaluate them.  While analysts can question and probe, they have no way to determine how accurately a company has responded.
  • Different areas of a company may respond differently to analyst questions.  It’s hard to determine objectively from the outside, which area of a company has the right perspective and which answer is correct.
  • When companies get too many surveys and requests for data, they stop responding to them.  This “survey fatigue” leads to gaps in the data collected.  Note that only a few thousand large companies have full-time staff available to answer researcher questions.
  • Often analysts cannot financially justify studying smaller companies.  There is little interest in smaller companies from the investor clients who pay for most CSR data collection.  As a result, most analyst-driven research covers a subset of the world’s 5,000 largest companies.  There are only a few data sets bigger than this, and they cover only limited subject areas.  There is very little coverage for private companies, public organizations, or companies based in emerging markets.

Large Companies Get Heavy ESG Attention

Large Companies Get Heavy ESG Attention

  • A human-driven process will always involve a certain amount of interpretation of the data.  This in turn can lead to biases that are hard to detect and remove.
  • Each human-driven result is based on its own schema and therefore they are hard to compare.  Companies do not understand why their rating varies from one system to the next and this reduces their confidence in all ratings systems.

It may be useful to take a look at some details of one company’s approach to a “Big Data” based analysis of CSR ratings. Our next post explains how CSRHub applies its methodology to address “Big Data” problems while also noting that every system has some limitations.


Bahar GidwaniBahar Gidwani is CEO and Co-founder of CSRHub.  He has built and run large technology-based businesses for many years. Bahar holds a CFA, worked on Wall Street with Kidder, Peabody, and with McKinsey & Co. Bahar has consulted to a number of major companies and currently serves on the board of several software and Web companies. He has an MBA from Harvard Business School and an undergraduate degree in physics and astronomy. Bahar is a member of the SASB Advisory Board.  He plays bridge, races sailboats, and is based in New York City.

CSRHub provides access to corporate social responsibility and sustainability ratings and information on 9,200+ companies from 135 industries in 106 countries. By aggregating and normalizing the information from 348 data sources, CSRHub has created a broad, consistent rating system and a searchable database that links millions of rating elements back to their source. Managers, researchers and activists use CSRHub to benchmark company performance, learn how stakeholders evaluate company CSR practices and seek ways to change the world.

 

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Using “Big Data” to Rate Corporate Social Responsibility: One Company’s Approach

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 21, 2012 9:18:40 AM / by Bahar Gidwani

The following is part 1 of a 3-part series on "Big Data."

By Bahar Gidwani

“Big Data” should be a useful tool for rating corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability performance.  It may be the answer to dealing with the rise in new ratings systems (it seems there is a new one announced each month) and with the disparities in scores that occur among these different systems.

In 2001, Doug Laney (currently an analyst for Gartner), foresaw that users of data were facing problems handling the Volume of data they were gathering, the Variety of data in their systems, and the Velocity with which data elements changed.  These “three Vs” are now part of most definitions of the “Big Data” area.

Ratings in the CSR space appear to be a candidate for a big data solution to its three “V” problems.

  • Volume:  There are many sources of ratings.  CSRHub currently tracks more than 175 sources of CSR information and plans to add at least another 30 sources over the next six months.  Our system already contains more than 13,000,000 pieces of data from these sources that touch more than 80,000 companies.  We hope eventually to expand our coverage to include several million companies.
  • Variety:  Each of these 175 sources uses different criteria to measure corporate sustainability and social performance.  A number of comprehensive sustainability measurement approaches have been created.  Unfortunately, each new entrant into the area seems compelled to create yet another system.
  • Velocity:  With hundreds of thousands of companies to measure and at least 175 different measurement systems, the perceived sustainability performance of companies constantly changes.  Many of the available ratings systems track these changes only on a quarterly or annual basis.

Most systems for measuring the CSR and sustainability performance of corporations rely on human-based analysis.  A researcher selects a set of companies to study, determines the criteria he or she wishes to use to evaluate their performance, and then collects the data needed to support the study.  When the researcher can’t find a required data item in a company’s sustainability report or press releases, he or she may try to contact the company to get the data.

Some research firms try to streamline this process by sending out a questionnaire that covers all the things they want to know.  Then, they follow up to encourage companies to answer their questions and follow up again after they receive the answers, to check the facts and be sure their questions were answered consistently.  An NAEM survey showed that its members were seeing an average of more than ten of these results in 2011, and some large companies say they receive as many as 300 survey requests per year.

NAEM Green Metrics That Matter Report—2012 for 35 members.

Both the direct and survey-driven approaches to data gathering are reasonable and can lead to sound ratings and valuable insights.  However, both are limited in several important ways:

  • The studied companies are the primary source of the data used to evaluate them.  While analysts can question and probe, they have no way to determine how accurately a company has responded.
  • Different areas of a company may respond differently to analyst questions.  It’s hard to determine objectively from the outside, which area of a company has the right perspective and which answer is correct.
  • When companies get too many surveys and requests for data, they stop responding to them.  This “survey fatigue” leads to gaps in the data collected.  Note that only a few thousand large companies have full-time staff available to answer researcher questions.
  • Often analysts cannot financially justify studying smaller companies.  There is little interest in smaller companies from the investor clients who pay for most CSR data collection.  As a result, most analyst-driven research covers a subset of the world’s 3,000 largest companies.  There are only a few data sets bigger than this, and they cover only limited subject areas.  There is very little coverage for private companies, public organizations, or companies based in emerging markets.
  • A human-driven process will always involve a certain amount of interpretation of the data.  This in turn can lead to biases that are hard to detect and remove.
  • Each human-driven result is based on its own schema and therefore they are hard to compare.  Companies do not understand why their rating varies from one system to the next and this reduces their confidence in all ratings systems.

It may be useful to take a look at some details of one company’s approach to a “Big Data” based analysis of CSR ratings. Our next post explains how CSRHub applies its methodology to address “Big Data” problems while also noting that every system has some limitations.


Bahar Gidwani is a Cofounder and CEO of CSRHub. Formerly, he was the CEO of New York-based Index Stock Imagery, Inc, from 1991 through its sale in 2006. He has built and run large technology-based businesses and has experience building a multi-million visitor Web site. Bahar holds a CFA, was a partner at Kidder, Peabody & Co., and worked at McKinsey & Co. Bahar has consulted to both large companies such as Citibank, GE, and Acxiom and a number of smaller software and Web-based companies. He has an MBA (Baker Scholar) from Harvard Business School and a BS in Astronomy and Physics (magna cum laude) from Amherst College. Bahar races sailboats, plays competitive bridge, and is based in New York City.

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